Sushi Master or RoboSushi Seller? A Career Choice

by Frank Roche on March 6, 2012

in Careers

The best sushi in the world took a lifetime of preparation.

At Sukiyabashi Jiro in Ginza, Tokyo, you eat 15 courses in 20 minutes. Pay approximately $400 cash. And have the dining experience of a lifetime.

“You can never reach perfection because no one knows where the top is,” says 85 year-old Jiro Ono, the owner of Sukiyabashi Jiro, considered by many to be the world’s greatest sushi chef. His restaurant, which seats only 10 people, is the only sushi restaurant in the world to receive Michelin’s 3-star rating.

How do I know all this? I watch movies.

My favorite movie of the Philadelphia Film Festival was Jiro Dreams of Sushi. As I watched the documentary about Jiro and his lifetime quest for simple perfection, I thought a lot about the instant and continuous gratification era we live in. For example, in Philadelphia, we have robot-made sushi and yogurt restaurant.

I wonder about how much time people in the people business are willing to put in to try to reach perfection. A lifetime? The really good ones do.

But it’s really easy to declare yourself a grand master sushi chef these days without ever learning the essence of the work. To claim expertise. To not spend the time on the craft. To not get simplicity and subtlety right.

My advice: Do work you’re proud of. Sure, RoboSushi sells. But perfection lives on for ages.

***********************
RSS and newsletter subscribers click here to see the trailer for Jiro Dreams of Sushi

{ 0 comments… add one now }

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: